Valencia College Transfer Agreements

Despite a population of a quarter of a million, Orlando offered only limited opportunities for higher education. Private colleges, such as Rollins College, were too expensive, and the University of Central Florida (UCF) accepted less than 50 percent of applicants. Mojocoa began to doubt his plan. “Saving money in the early years of university was important because I knew I would need a master`s degree to get a good job in architecture,” she said. When she grew up, Yuly Mojocoa dreamed of following in her father`s footsteps and becoming an architect. When she began her college research in her junior year at Timber Creek High School in Orlando, she quickly decided she wanted to stay close to home. After hearing stories of students struggling to pay their student loans, she chose to live with her parents while studying so she could cut her bills while helping her family. Mojocoa accepted a part-time job as an office assistant in order to pay for everything out of her own pocket. National Awards and Recognition: The College of Valencia is recognized by the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence as one of the best colleges in the United States. Our art faculty is known as one of the best in the region, and director Steven Spielberg called our film program one of the best of all time.

We offer the same training as a state university, only at about half the cost. At Valencia College, you`ll get more support along the way with smaller campuses and classes. We are in fourth place in the United States for the number of Associate Degrees and among the best producers of transfer students in universities with 25% of the upper class UCF students in Valencia. With DirectConnect, Valencia and UCF were able to plug leaks in the pipeline. Four out of five graduates from Valencia move on to UCF and students who go through DirectConnect have similar graduation rates and averages to those who have passed through UCF every four years. Community college students who joined UCF now account for 48 percent of all students who earn a bachelor`s degree. The development of other 2+2+2 programs requires coordination between higher education and the business world, as well as between colleges and universities, often competing for students, said Frank Bosworth, who helped launch the master`s architecture program in Orlando. “Development has been encouraged by the local chapter of the AIA (American Institute of Architects) and institutions that have seen mutual benefit,” he said. . . .