United States Mexico Canada Trade Agreement

In addition to its work with the WTO, the United States has concluded trade agreements with 20 countries that cover a number of issues, ranging from tariffs on goods and access to the agricultural market to intellectual property and the environment. For the FDA, the specific themes are chapters of agreements on regulatory issues such as SPS measures, OBTs and good regulatory practices – as well as sector chapters on cosmetics, medical devices and drugs, if any. The FDA helps develop negotiation proposals in the United States and the FDA is actively involved in trade negotiations with U.S. trading partners. An April 2019 Analysis by the International Trade Commission on the likely effects of the USMCA estimated that the agreement would increase U.S. real GDP by 0.35 percent if the agreement were fully implemented (six years after ratification) and would increase total U.S. employment by 0.12% (176,000 jobs). [114] [115] The analysis cited by another Congressional Research Service study showed that the agreement would not have a measurable effect on employment, wages or overall economic growth. [114] In the summer of 2019, Larry Kudlow, Trump`s chief economic adviser (the director of the National Economic Council at Trump White House), made unfounded statements about the likely economic impact of the agreement and overstated forecasts related to jobs and GDP growth.

[114] The Trump administration`s office proposed the USMCA citing new digital trade measures, strengthening the protection of trade secrets and adapting the rules of origin of the automobile among the benefits of the trade agreement. [112] During his 2016 election campaign and presidency, Trump sharply criticized NAFTA (it was often called “perhaps the worst trade deal of all time”[105] while hailing the USMCA as “an excellent deal for all of us.” [106] However, the USMCA is very similar to nafta, has adopted many identical provisions and has made only modest changes, mostly cosmetic,[107] and is expected to have only a limited economic impact. [108] Former U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor, who oversaw the signing of NAFTA during Bill Clinton`s administration, said, “This is really NAFTA of origin.” [109] – Supporting a 21st Century Economy with New Protections for the United States